Three Easter Wheat Grass Centerpieces and an Update

On the day of our dinner, I quickly snapped some pictures with a few Easter eggs placed in the wheat grass to show you a few ideas for Easter centerpieces.

This is a piece of the wheat grass that was grown on a paper towel.  The grass in the pictures is taller than I would have preferred it to be to add eggs.  I think that the height after growing the grass for 6 or 7 days would have been a better height. (This was day 11.)

Hindsight, I should have added a wide ribbon around the center of the grass in the milk glass dish to pull it up straight, oh well, next time! :)

This little box is 6" long.  The ends of the box are the tops of the fence slats that were leftover from when I made the large boxes.  I think I want to paint one (of the four small boxes I made) white and distress it for an Easter basket centerpiece with wheat grass and eggs, maybe even add a stencil.


Some of you have wondered how long the grass will last.  This is only the second time that I've grown it, so I can only tell you from my limited experience.  The first grass that I grew looked really bad by day twenty.  It was brown and limp and looked awful.  (I only kept it this long because I kept forgetting to take a picture so I could show you.)

Now I believe that I over-watered it.  Once the wheat grass is established, it really doesn't take very much water to maintain it (depending on your climate and house temperature).  On this second round, at day eighteen, the wheat grass started to look pretty unruly.  You can see the base was turning yellow, it was beginning to fall over at the ends of the box, and the tips of the grass were turning brown.  (I had already trimmed it with scissors multiple times at this point.)  I thought it was a goner again, but decided to trim it up one more time, but shorter than I had been trimming it before, pluck the grass that was sticking out of the sides, and see how it did.

As you can see, it made a big difference!  I think the key might be to keep it trimmed short.  I still don't think that it will last too many more days, guess we'll see! 

Here's a side by side look of the before and after.  I'm keeping track and will add an update to this post to let you know how long I can keep the grass green this time.  The challenge is on!

Update:  Well, the grass varied some on how long it lasted.  From my experience it lasted around 3 weeks, give or take a few days from when I planted it.   At the end of that time it was looking old.  I think because it's so easy to plant and grows so fast, if you want grass for an extended period of time, replant it.  Maybe even stagger it so you constantly have grass that looks nice. 

Are any of you growing wheat grass for Easter this year?  Do you have any fun ideas you're trying for centerpieces?

I just realized that Friday marked 1 1/2 years to the day of when I made this blog public.  It's so hard to believe it's been that long!  Thanks so very much for reading, for supporting me, and for making this such a fun experience! 

Today's Fabulous Finds... Simple Easter (Wheat Grass) Centerpieces 

Linking up to my favorite parties!
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Cindy@OldTimePickers said...

I really like the look of the grass for a centerpiece. The eggs are a cute idea and so perfect for Easter! I may have to try this!

Lissa (Bellenza) said...

So sweet of you to be so thorough in documenting your wheat grass-growing experience! From your examples with Easter eggs and daisies, it could clearly make a wonderful decor base for many things!

Karen said...

Such a cool idea Janet! I love how the eggs look in the grass and the flowers look great too. You are such a creative person:) Take care-

lynn said...

oh, the eggs look great in the grass, janet!

James Black said...
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